Archive for May, 2016

Hawaii Restaurant Hall of Fame nominees sought

By
May 31st, 2016



The Hawaii Restaurant Association is accepting nominations for its 10th annual Hall of Fame awards program, which honors people and companies for industry achievements.
Winners chosen will have a track record of contributing to the enhancement of the restaurant and foodservice industry; providing service to the industry through civic or educational outreach, and for demonstrating dedication and commitment to the growth of the industry.
The 2015 winners included chefs and restaurateurs Alan Wong and Ed Kenney; Roy and Dora Hayashi of Like Like Drive Inn; Glenn Tamura, of  Tamura’s Market and Tamura’s Fine Wine & Liquors; and inductees from the neighbor islands as well.
Nominations will be accepted through June 30, with the Hawaii Restaurant Hall of Fame Awards Dinner scheduled for September 21 at a yet-to-be-announced venue.
Nominations may be submitted online here .

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Hukilau bounty

By
May 28th, 2016



The Hawaii Food & Wine Festival's Culinary Journey closed Friday night with a Hukilau Beach Cookout at the Kahala Hotel & Resort. The event was considered a preview for the festival, which takes place in October.
A sampling of the night's dishes, photos courtesy Pono Media:
paella
Paella a la Marinera (Fisherman's Paella) by Vikram Garg.
pig
Roast Pig, Grape and Ogo Poke, with Betel Leaves by Andrew Le of Pig and the Lady.
bag
"Da Bag” — lobster, clams, sausage, shrimp, potatoes and corn on the cob by Alan Wong.
pulehu
Pulehu Hawaii Ranchers Rib Eye with Thai Basil Chimichurri and a Side of Crispy Brussels Sprouts and Cauliflower by Roy Yamaguchi.
poke
Kapakahi Poke — ahi, hamachi, opihi, chili flakes and inamona by Elmer Guzman of Poke Stop.
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Special bites for Memorial Day

By
May 28th, 2016



Avenue's Memorial Day Malasadas with lemon curd.

Avenue's Memorial Day Malasadas with lemon curd.

Head to Kaimuki this holiday weekend for some memorable meals:

At 12th Ave Grill, a Sunday Supper Memorial Day BBQ Sampler shows off local craft beer pairings with meats and sausage made on site.

The menu: Cherry Wood Smoked Baby Back Ribs, 12-hour Hawaii Ranchers Brisket, House Made Kielbasa and dessert of Buttermilk Pound Cake with Amaretto-Macerated Strawberries. Limited-edition Maui Brewing Co. beers will be served alongside. Cost is $32, served family style on Sunday and Monday. Call 732-9469.

At Avenue's Bar + Eatery, bite-sized malasadas with Meyer lemon curd are a holiday treat, along with a special cocktail, For Love + Honor, made with Buffalo Trace bourbon, egg white, India pale ale, orange liqueur, citrus juices and cherry syrup. Call 744-7567.
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Foodies can nom nom nominate faves for new food and drink awards

By
May 26th, 2016



The inaugural Taste Talks Food & Drink Awards has just been announced for September, and organizers are inviting nominations and votes for 30 categories of awards. There's also a possible prize for those who submit nominations.

TasteTalks_logo_BLUE_1000x213

Categories include best food startup, best food-related Instagram account, and best nonprofit. The awards also are intended to highlight chefs, restaurants, innovators, and food media, according to the Taste Talks website.
Mo Rocca, a “CBS Sunday Morning” correspondent and host of cable shows such as “Henry Ford's Innovation Nation” and “My Grandmother's Ravioli,” will host the awards ceremony in New York Sept. 26.

Rocca will host Taste Talks' inaugural food and drink awards program in September. Courtesy photo.

Rocca will host Taste Talks' inaugural food and drink awards program in September.
Courtesy photo.

"The only thing I like better than eating is awards shows," said Rocca in a statement, adding, “I hope there's an ‘In Memoriam’ for all the great meals I devoured in the last year."

Members of the team behind Taste Talks, an online editorial platform and national festival series, aren’t all based in New York City, though Taste Talks was created from a so-called thought leadership conference and barbecue in Brooklyn. It now is three, weekend-long food, drink, culture and music events in New York and elsewhere.

"We've created a culinary awards program that is celebrating what's inspiring the new generation of food and drink lovers," said Awards Director Will Levitt. "We're excited to celebrate America's best people, places and ideas in food, with a real focus on culture, innovation and diversity."

Nominations from the public will be voted on by Taste Talks Voting Academy members, who include musician and pop culture figure Questlove, pastry chef and Momofuku Milk Bar founder and owner Christina Tosi, Dominique Ansel, owner of a self-named bakery and creator of the cronut, or doughnut made like a croissant, as well as dozens of others.
Producers of the awards program have created a short video to promote the awards competition.

Nominations can be submitted free online, here,  through June 20. Each Friday, people who submit nominees will be entered to win free tickets to the awards show at the Brooklyn Academy of Music Howard Gilman Opera House.

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First look: Roy's on the beach

By
May 26th, 2016



The Turtle Bay Trio is one of the dishes developed for the new Roy's Beach House menu: a coffee-crusted rib-eye steak, king crab ceviche and Ichiko sea scallop.

The Turtle Bay Trio is one of the dishes developed for the new Roy's Beach House menu: a coffee-crusted rib-eye steak, king crab ceviche and Ichiko sea scallop.

Roy Yamaguchi's new restaurant at the Turtle Bay resort will be his first on the beach, his first with a takeout window, his first to serve a Cobb salad or a shrimp Louie.

Roy's Beach House opens in August in the former Ola location right on the sand. The original structure has been gutted and is undergoing reconstruction, from the lanai deck to the landscaping lining the parking-lot fence.

Roy Yamaguchi, right, looks over plans for the new restaurant with his contractor, in the area that will be the new bar.

Roy Yamaguchi, right, looks over plans for the new restaurant with his contractor, in the area that will be the new bar.

Yamaguchi gave a tour of the site and a preview of the menu Wednesday as part of events in the Hawaii Food & Wine Festival's spring Culinary Journey.

Despite having dozens of restaurants all over the world, he has no beachside location, Yamaguchi said, so when he was offered this one, "I said, 'Yeah!' I always wanted to be on the beach."

A wooden deck will surround the open-air-under-roof dining room.

A wooden deck will surround the open-air-under-roof dining room.

Beach House will seat 90 under roof — in a dining area with sliding doors that will remain open as long as it's not raining or terribly windy. A wrap-around patio will accommodate 50 to 60 more, and the restaurant will extend to lounge chairs on the sand for those interested in, say, hot dogs.

A takeout window behind the kitchen will serve "our famous Roy's to go," the chef said. "Famous starting in July."

Bowls of steamed New Zealand Cockles in coconut curry sauce were plated in a makeshift serving area at the unfinished restaurant for a preview dinner Wednesday. The dish is  planned for the new Roy's Beach House menu.

Bowls of steamed New Zealand Cockles in coconut curry sauce were plated in a makeshift serving area at the unfinished restaurant for a preview dinner Wednesday. The dish is planned for the new Roy's Beach House menu.

Much of the menu is still in the thinking stage, under development with Beach House's executive chef, Roy's veteran Gordon Hopkins. Yamaguchi said it will combine some of Roy's classic dishes with new items suited to a "beachy environment."

He describes salads, crudos, burgers and hot dogs — "a cross between comfort food and Roy's ... Roy's new modern."

Also on the new menu: onaga with pohole fern, chantrelles and a tableside pour of luau leaf sauce.

Also on the new menu: onaga with pohole fern, chantrelles and a tableside pour of luau leaf sauce.

Certain American classics are in the design stage, among them a Reuben sandwich, shrimp Louie and Cobb salad.

"One of the things I really love is a Cobb salad," he said. "Wherever I go I eat a Cobb salad." He's working on a version of the classic chopped salad made with slow-roasted turkey.

After Beach House, Yamaguchi will open three more Hawaii restaurants this year, at the International Marketplace, in Kapolei and on Maui.

Dinner ended with strawberry-cognac macarons, served with dots of lilikoi curd and haupia and a chocolate crunch.

Dinner ended with strawberry-cognac macarons, served with dots of lilikoi curd and haupia and a chocolate crunch.

 

 

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Food and wine fest features fish

By
May 25th, 2016



This opah, or moonfish, was presented at the United Fishing Agency auction. It is also known as Moonfish.

This opah, or moonfish, was presented at the United Fishing Agency auction.

Tuesday started early for Hawaii Food and Wine Festival participants who wanted to see Honolulu’s famed fish auction and visit Tamashiro Market to sample poke.
Chefs George Mavrothalassitis and Lee Anne Wong accompanied the tour and talked story with paid guests, answering questions along the way. They were to conduct a poke demonstration at the  Kahala Hotel & Resort, host hotel for the HF&WF Culinary Journey launch event.
John Kaneko of the nonprofit Hawaii Seafood Council led the United Fishing Agency fish auction tour, which started pier-side with an explanation of how commercial long-line fishing boat crews lay their lines while out on the ocean, with hooks at depths ranging from 50 meters to 350 meters.
With some 3,000 baited hooks, the percentage of fish caught each time the line is laid, is 1.1, he said. “Ninety-nine of 100 hooks are empty,” he said, so the boats are out for 11 to 14 days, and immediately process the fish and stow them below deck on ice.
Once inside United Fishing Agency, the auction was in full swing, with pallets of fish being wheeled in as Kaneko explained the differences between the grades of fish, the basics of what to look for when choosing fish at the market, and more.

John Kaneko, of the nonprofit Hawaii Seafood Council, explains the fresh fish grading process.

John Kaneko, of the nonprofit Hawaii Seafood Council, explains the fresh fish grading process.

The fish are laid side-by-side with a portion of the tail cut out, yielding a flat, or fileted cut and a “steak” cut, as well as a cored sample. The auctioneer barks out information about each fish, and fish buyers stake their claims before moving on to the next fish.
For those of us who are not experts, the differences between the big eye ahi flesh from fish to fish was stunning. Color and texture ranged from lusciously glistening and red, to lighter red with pinky, fatty tissue prized by many, to brown and dull, some with space between the muscle tissue. Kaneko described the latter as “gaping,” and said the brown flesh definitely would not be destined for use as sashimi.
Anything at the supermarket that is cherry red and “screaming at you” has likely been gassed with carbon monoxide to enhance the fish’s color, Kaneko said. The council offers fish auction tours via its website.

It was then on to Tamashiro Market, where owner Guy Tamashiro, a regular at the fish auction, is getting a new parking lot at his North King Street shop.
Tamashiro’s is known not just as one of the go-to stops for New Year’s ahi, but for selling reef fish and other seafoods popular with local residents, as well as produce including green papaya, marungay leaves, raw peanuts, and other items not readily found at many supermarkets.
Of the reef fish, Uhu is very popular, Tamashiro said.
They live in “harems,” Tamashiro explained, adding that if the male should die, a dominant female will transform into a male to keep the group going. Males are blue, and females are red, and while undergoing the gender change, the red female will begin to turn blue.
“I only learned that today,” said Mavro, though he loves cooking uhu, and says the female of the species has a superior flavor.

Tamashiro Market owner Guy Tamashiro pulled two uhu from the display, to show the gender-changing process the formerly female one in front had been undergoing. The blue fish immediately behind it, is male.

Tamashiro Market owner Guy Tamashiro pulled two uhu from the display, to show the gender-changing process the formerly female one in front had been undergoing. The blue fish immediately behind it, is male.

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It takes a village, and sometimes, a very cute baby

By
May 24th, 2016



Photo by Craig T. Kojima Aki "Frankie" Noguchi was the eternal sweetheart during a photo shoot last week at the beautiful Papahana Kuaola in Heeia. What better way to convey the virtues of kalo than a healthy, happy baby eating her kalo pop? We were able to indulge the modeling talent of Frankie thanks to the generosity of her mother, Amanda Corby Noguchi, who made the poi pops Frankie enjoyed and drove her daughter to the picturesque site.

Photo by Craig T. Kojima
Aki "Frankee" Noguchi was an eternal sweetheart during a photo shoot last week at the beautiful Papahana Kuaola in Heeia, for a food story on kalo. What better way to convey the virtues of kalo than with a healthy, happy baby eating her kalo pop? We were able to indulge the modeling talent of Frankee thanks to the generosity of her mother, Amanda Corby Noguchi, who made the poi pops Frankee enjoyed and took the time to drive her daughter to the picturesque site.

When feature writers produce a story, part of the deal is figuring out how to best illustrate what we're writing about. Sometimes we ask staff artists to create a drawing or graphic, but most of the time our photographers do the job.

Often, our plans require help outside the newsroom staff. As my friend Amanda Corby Noguchi says, "Sometimes it takes a village."

Case in point: For my story tomorrow on the many ways to cook kalo, Crave editor Betty Shimabukuro and I were pondering the best way to illustrate the topic. Much of the images in Crave are food shots — these are sure to draw interest — but kalo, while delicious, doesn't necessarily produce the most colorful dishes. What I knew I had were recipes for a banana bread using kalo flour and a kalo baby biscuit.

Now, Betty is gifted at thinking up great ideas on a whim.

"My dream shot is to have a baby eating a kalo biscuit while sitting under a tall kalo plant," she said, then laughed at the seeming outrageousness of her idea. Betty designs many of the pages for Crave.

Hmmmm. I didn't necessarily think it was pie-in-the-sky. There are kalo farms all over the place, with generous farmers always ready to lend a hand.

And I knew just the mommy to ask about lending us her baby.

Amanda runs and owns Pili Group with her husband, chef Mark Noguchi, and the couple produce the cutest babies — preschooler Elee (Eleanor) and 10-month-old Frankee (aka Aki), the baby I was thinking of.

Amanda, always helpful, was quick to say yes.

Also quick to lend a hand was Kapaliku Schirman of Papahana Kuaola, a gorgeous 63-acre site in Heeia that provides educational environmental programs using Hawaiian cultural knowledge. The site is rife with gorgeous loi and thriving kalo plants.

We were all set.

Then the kalo biscuit recipe fell through — and with it, our dream shot. Or so we thought.

"How about we use my poi smoothie pops instead?" Amanda suggested breezily in the midst of my freak-out. "I can whip some up and bring them to the shoot. Frankee LOVES them."

True to her mother's word, Frankee did love them. In fact, she went through three pops like nobody's business. All while being the cutest, sweetest, most agreeable baby I've ever met. She even smiled on cue.

Throughout the shoot, Kainoa Pestana of Papahana Kuaola helped us along, from picking just the right kalo, which Frankee sat under contently, to propping up leaves just so, while photographer Craig Kojima snapped away with his camera.

Needless to say, the shots were beautiful. Or as Betty said, they're some of the cutest shots in the history of food covers.

There's honestly no way to convey the deep gratitude I have for everyone who helped us pull this off, from superwoman Amanda and baby Frankee, whom I'm completely enamored of, to Kapaliku and Kainoa, both gracious and kind.

Please take a look at Crave tomorrow. When you pick it up, you'll fall for Frankee, too. (And don't forget to turn the page and read the story.)

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BBQ champion on the way

By
May 23rd, 2016



Grillmaster Myron Mixon

Master griller Myron Mixon

 
If you have a grill at home and aren't afraid to use it, you are a handy home outdoor cook. But when you get really, really good at it, you become a pitmaster.

This is the title worn by Myron Mixon, deemed the "winningest man in barbecue," a barbecue TV celebrity from the shows "Smoked," "BBQ Rules," "BBQ Pitmasters" and "BBQ Pitwars."

Mixon headlines at the Honolulu BBQ and Blues Festival, June 17 and 18 (Father's Day weekend, if you're looking for ideas) at the Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Beach Resort.

On the 17th (Friday) Mixon holds a hands-on cooking class, teaching how to prepare several classic dishes. The next day is the festival on the resort's great lawn, with grilled dishes for sale and entertainment by the swing band Kahulanui, Kalapana and other guest artists.

The cooking class runs from 5 to 8 p.m.; cost is $149, which includes admission to the festival the next day, a full barbecue spread, beer and wine.

Tickets to to the festival are $20 in advance, $30 at the door, military $10, children under 15 free. Food and drink are extra. The menu: smoked southern-style hog, smoked turkey, chicken, dry-rub ribs, brisket, sausage, kalua pig, classic Southern sides and a dessert station. Parking is $8 self-park, $13 valet.
Purchase tickets at hiltonhawaiianvillage.com/bbq call 947-7955.

For those who'd like to make a weekend of it, kamaaina room rates of $179 per night are available, and on Father's Day Tropics Bar & Grill will feature a southern barbecue menu.

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Psst! Want a great bargain?

By
May 19th, 2016



Screen Shot 2016-05-19 at 6.13.59 PM

Here are a couple of noteworthy supermarket deals:

Tomorrow only: At Whole Foods Market, wine lovers can get 30 percent off the store's entire wine selection, except Three Wishes. If you're a serious wine drinker — or have lots of wine-loving friends — consider purchasing 12 bottles or more. That'll get you 40 percent off. That's a deal worth drinking to.

Throughout May: Foodland's decided to celebrate the month with "31 Days of May-nia, Crazy, Amazing Daily Deals." Each day, the store offers a sale on one item that lasts just for the day. Yesterday, I picked up a 20-pound bag of rice for under $10. Today, the sale item is 4 pounds of either extra-large or jumbo shrimp for $17.99 (limit 5). Who knows what tomorrow will bring? Just make sure you use your Maika‘i card or ask the cashier to sign you up.

Check out the daily deal at foodland.com/31-days-may-nia. Or sign up for Foodland's newsletter, which will automatically send you an email daily about the sale item. Visit foodland.com/Savings/foodland-newsletter

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Super cool tool

By
May 18th, 2016



spurtle

Ever stumble upon a tool that ends up being something you can’t live without? This happened to me years ago, when I still lived at home and my mother was gifted with a wooden spatula, slightly curved and pointed on one end, that made nearly every stovetop task easier to execute. When I moved out I pondered stealing it.

So it was with this educated eye that I assessed the Spurtle, from Mad Hungry. Part spoon, part spatula, the Spurtle is a seemingly unassuming paddle with a long, wide flat surface that allows for efficiency and versatility. It makes quick work of tossing a panful of stir-fry or fried rice, folding delicate whipped cream into a dessert, scraping the flesh from a squash, scraping the edges and corners of a pan, and scooping and spreading a nut butter over a slice of bread in one fell swoop. And because the Spurtle is flat, it's simple to scrape off any food or sauce stuck on its surface, by simply scraping it against the edge of the pan or bowl you're working with.

It’s a tool to reach for everyday. And because it's wooden, it won't scratch pots and pans. The Spurtle is based on a 500-year-old tool from Scotland, originally used for stirring vats of oatmeal.

Mad Hungry is a cooking website run by cookbook author and television cooking show host Lucinda Scala Quinn and her sons. Quinn is also a senior vice president at Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia. All this media experience has made Quinn quite savvy, and she peddles her Spurtles on the television shopping channel QVC (channel 2 on Oceanic Time Warner), which is where I got my set.

It comprises four pieces made of acacia: a full-size, 12-3/4-by-2-inch Spurtle; a full-size slotted version, a mini, 8-3/4-by-2-inch solid Spurtle, and a long, made-to-fit spoon rest. Though the set was priced at $19.98, after an exorbitant $9.22 shipping to Hawaii, plus $1.31 tax, the grand total was $30.51. Still, at about $7.63 apiece and a one-year warranty, the ease it provides in the kitchen makes it a worthwhile investment.

Here are some other things I saw Quinn do with the Spurtle in a video on QVC's site (qvc.com), which is posted along with the product info: With the regular tool, she scooped mayo into a bowl with some canned tuna or chicken (I couldn't tell which) and was able to stir and break up meat chunks, then fold in other ingredients, in mere seconds. Using the slotted Spurtle, she efficiently incorporated butter into a pot of cooked potato chunks while roughly mashing them; scrambled eggs by using the tool as a whisk; whisked dry ingredients, then whisked it with wet ingredients; and even separated eggs by resting the tool over a bowl and carefully pouring precracked eggs over the slots. The mini spreader made rapid work of frosting cupcakes with one quick twist of the wrist.

At madhungry.com, a two-piece bamboo set sells for $24.99, with a standard $8 shipping to Hawaii. It includes a 13-by-2-inch Spurtle and a 8-3/4-by-2-inch mini version.

Posted in Food, Home Cooking, Shopping | Comments Off on Super cool tool

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