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Psst! Want a great bargain?

By
May 19th, 2016



Screen Shot 2016-05-19 at 6.13.59 PM

Here are a couple of noteworthy supermarket deals:

Tomorrow only: At Whole Foods Market, wine lovers can get 30 percent off the store's entire wine selection, except Three Wishes. If you're a serious wine drinker — or have lots of wine-loving friends — consider purchasing 12 bottles or more. That'll get you 40 percent off. That's a deal worth drinking to.

Throughout May: Foodland's decided to celebrate the month with "31 Days of May-nia, Crazy, Amazing Daily Deals." Each day, the store offers a sale on one item that lasts just for the day. Yesterday, I picked up a 20-pound bag of rice for under $10. Today, the sale item is 4 pounds of either extra-large or jumbo shrimp for $17.99 (limit 5). Who knows what tomorrow will bring? Just make sure you use your Maika‘i card or ask the cashier to sign you up.

Check out the daily deal at foodland.com/31-days-may-nia. Or sign up for Foodland's newsletter, which will automatically send you an email daily about the sale item. Visit foodland.com/Savings/foodland-newsletter

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Super cool tool

By
May 18th, 2016



spurtle

Ever stumble upon a tool that ends up being something you can’t live without? This happened to me years ago, when I still lived at home and my mother was gifted with a wooden spatula, slightly curved and pointed on one end, that made nearly every stovetop task easier to execute. When I moved out I pondered stealing it.

So it was with this educated eye that I assessed the Spurtle, from Mad Hungry. Part spoon, part spatula, the Spurtle is a seemingly unassuming paddle with a long, wide flat surface that allows for efficiency and versatility. It makes quick work of tossing a panful of stir-fry or fried rice, folding delicate whipped cream into a dessert, scraping the flesh from a squash, scraping the edges and corners of a pan, and scooping and spreading a nut butter over a slice of bread in one fell swoop. And because the Spurtle is flat, it's simple to scrape off any food or sauce stuck on its surface, by simply scraping it against the edge of the pan or bowl you're working with.

It’s a tool to reach for everyday. And because it's wooden, it won't scratch pots and pans. The Spurtle is based on a 500-year-old tool from Scotland, originally used for stirring vats of oatmeal.

Mad Hungry is a cooking website run by cookbook author and television cooking show host Lucinda Scala Quinn and her sons. Quinn is also a senior vice president at Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia. All this media experience has made Quinn quite savvy, and she peddles her Spurtles on the television shopping channel QVC (channel 2 on Oceanic Time Warner), which is where I got my set.

It comprises four pieces made of acacia: a full-size, 12-3/4-by-2-inch Spurtle; a full-size slotted version, a mini, 8-3/4-by-2-inch solid Spurtle, and a long, made-to-fit spoon rest. Though the set was priced at $19.98, after an exorbitant $9.22 shipping to Hawaii, plus $1.31 tax, the grand total was $30.51. Still, at about $7.63 apiece and a one-year warranty, the ease it provides in the kitchen makes it a worthwhile investment.

Here are some other things I saw Quinn do with the Spurtle in a video on QVC's site (qvc.com), which is posted along with the product info: With the regular tool, she scooped mayo into a bowl with some canned tuna or chicken (I couldn't tell which) and was able to stir and break up meat chunks, then fold in other ingredients, in mere seconds. Using the slotted Spurtle, she efficiently incorporated butter into a pot of cooked potato chunks while roughly mashing them; scrambled eggs by using the tool as a whisk; whisked dry ingredients, then whisked it with wet ingredients; and even separated eggs by resting the tool over a bowl and carefully pouring precracked eggs over the slots. The mini spreader made rapid work of frosting cupcakes with one quick twist of the wrist.

At madhungry.com, a two-piece bamboo set sells for $24.99, with a standard $8 shipping to Hawaii. It includes a 13-by-2-inch Spurtle and a 8-3/4-by-2-inch mini version.

Posted in Food, Home Cooking, Shopping | Comments Off on Super cool tool

Boba on the house!

By
May 7th, 2016



George Huang and worker Nicole Moon served up milk teas in a rainbow of colors and flavors at Mr. Tea Café's new shop in the Salt complex yesterday at a media preview. Star-Advertiser photographer Dennis Oda captured their magic.

George Huang and worker Nicole Moon served up milk teas in a rainbow of colors and flavors at Mr. Tea Café's new shop in the Salt complex yesterday at a media preview. Honolulu Star-Advertiser photographer Dennis Oda captured their magic. Read more about the shop and it's delicious drinks in Wednesday's Crave.

RED ALERT: Get a free milk tea, today only!

There are never too many opportunities for a cold treat, and now we have another place to get one at Mr. Tea Café in Kakaako, which opens today.

In the cute, pretty spankin'-new shop behind Starbucks in the Salt complex, owner George Huang will serve complimentary milk tea drinks — boba and otherwise — to make new fans. He's getting ready to serve 2,000 refreshing drinks in four teas with an array of tasty add-ins.

The store is Huang's second location; the first is on Kapiolani Boulevard in the Ward area.

Visit Mr. Tea Café, Kakaako location, from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. today, at 691 Auahi St.

The flavor possibilities are endless at Mr. Tea Café.

The flavor possibilities are endless at Mr. Tea Café.

 

While the shop is a tiny space, there are a few quaint seating spaces right outside.

While the shop is a tiny space, there are a few quaint seating spaces right outside.

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Shave ice, l'dat

By
May 5th, 2016



Kauai students turn a spotlight on shave ice, from its humble original form to some of the latest modern versions, on tonight's episode of Hiki No, airing at 7:30 p.m. on PBS Hawaii.

Kauai students turn a spotlight on shave ice, from its humble original form to some of the latest modern versions, on tonight's episode of Hiki No, airing at 7:30 p.m. on PBS Hawaii.

When students of Kapaa High School's digital media class were faced with the task of creating something for Hiki No, the statewide student news network, they settled on profiling something "easy" — shave ice, the classic local snack of ice doused in colored syrup.

"But they found out it was NOT easy," said teacher Michelle Rundbaken.

Pesky stuff like a longstanding history didn't make for a simple assignment.

The result of Kapaa students' hard work hits the airwaves tonight at 7:30 p.m. on PBS Hawaii as part of the latest Hiki No episode. After tonight's broadcast, the episode will be posted on the station's website, PBSHawaii.org/hikino. It will repeat at noon May 7 and 3 p.m. May 8.

The shave-ice project in fact turned out to be so not-easy that, while most projects take one semester to finish, this one extended over to the next and was completed by a different set of students.

In the end, the youths profiled some of the latest incarnations of shave ice on Kauai, including all-natural versions free of artificial colors and topped with organic products. They also delved into a bit of shave-ice history.

The episode will also include an inspiring piece from Waianae Intermediate School chronicling its after-school activities director's weight-loss journey; Hongwanji Mission School's profile of a blind singer who dispels myths about what it's like to live without sight; Hana K-12 School's demonstration of making prints with backyard items; and Campbell High School's out-of-the-box techniques that tell the story of a young woman with cerebral palsy.

Hiki No comprises 86 public, private and charter schools across the state. Visit Facebook.com/hikinocando.

Posted in Education, Food | Comments Off on Shave ice, l'dat

Mom's secret ingredient

By
May 4th, 2016



The complimentary pistou soup being served at Chef Mavro on Mother's Day is the good chef's mom's recipe, and a favorite of the Mavrothalassitis family.

The complimentary pistou soup being served at Chef Mavro on Mother's Day is the good chef's mom's recipe, and a favorite of the Mavrothalassitis family.

Watch your salt, eliminate sugar, beware of GMOs, think organic. Healthful food takes consideration.

But there's more to nourishment than dietary guidelines. The key is something that's often lost in our cerebral world.

A heartfelt note from a son about his mother's food brings it all into perspective. The son: George Mavrothalassitis, chef-owner of Chef Mavro.

He starts, " My mom was an angel," and goes on to explain the details of his mother's beloved pistou soup, a hearty dish filled with fresh produce, ham hocks and pork belly. It was the stuff she raised her family on.

Then, he continues, "I must tell you a secret. My mother was not a good cook …"

Mavrothalassitis said family long wondered about the mystery of what made his mother's soup so great. In his function as a chef, he's solved the puzzle.

"Since she left me I'm still making every spring her recipe with a lot of emotion (and) love," he wrote. "I didn't change anything from the ingredients to the method ... nothing ... thinking of her I'm putting the ton of love she used to add as a secret ingredient!"

And so, for Mother's Day dinner at Chef Mavro, he shares with diners a bit of his late mother's love with a complimentary serving of her pistou soup as an additional course.

I'm not sure if there are still seats available on Mother's Day but it would be worth a call to inquire, just for a chance to taste first-hand a dish that truly nourished — and no doubt shaped — one of Hawaii's finest chefs.

Chef Mavro is at 1969 S. King St. Call 944-4714 or visit chefmavro.com.

Posted in Eating Out, Food, Home Cooking | Comments Off on Mom's secret ingredient

Thinking big

By
May 1st, 2016



Campbell High School made an amazing plate of sous vide lamb chops with a broccoli garlic mashed potato and Ewa sweet onion merlot sauce. A charred broccoli and corn relish accompanied the chops.

Campbell High School made an amazing plate of sous vide lamb chops with a broccoli garlic mashed potato and Ewa sweet onion merlot sauce, at Aloun Farms' high-school culinary competition Saturday. A charred broccoli and corn relish accompanied the chops. Judge Keoni Chang said the lamb was cooked better than he's had at most restaurants. See more of the dishes, from eight public high schools, in Crave on Wednesday.

At Aloun Farms' 4th Annual Sweet Onion Culinary Competition Saturday at Kapolei High School, eight teams displayed just how evolved high-school culinary education has become. But competition dishes such as Sous Vide Lamb Chops with Aloun Farms Charred Broccoli and Corn Relish, Ewa Sweet Onion Merlot Butter Sauce and Aloun Farms Broccoli Garlic Mashed Potatoes are just the tip of the iceberg.

A chat with culinary teachers outside the competition kitchen, where they waited for their student teams, made me understand how such young cooks could pull off such sophisticated dishes. It's because the programs they belong to are doing amazing things.

At Moanalua, which was entering the Aloun contest for the first time, students cook in a certified kitchen, which allows them to feed lucky faculty. Instructor Lars Mitsuda, who looks so young I almost mistook him for a student, says his program is famous for its homemade breads and pastas.

I got the chance to try a small bite of their onion bread, which was included on the competition plate. It was amazing. (In fact, I thought Moanalua's use of Aloun onions — it, along with broccoli and corn, were three ingredients to be included in each dish — was one of the most creative applications.)

Pearl City's crisp mac nut- and panko-coated mahi mahi was buttery deliciousness, and it's sweet potato mash, which included apple banana for added flavor, was ingenious.

Pearl City's crisp mac nut- and panko-coated mahi mahi was buttery deliciousness, and it's sweet potato mash, which included apple banana for added flavor, was ingenious.

Pearl City culinary teacher Shawn Kimball, herself a trained culinarian, helps students create special menus to correlate with classes being taught on campus. If a history class is studying Greek history, for instance, her students research and develop a Greek menu that they serve to students. Kimball said that when her students developed a Japanese menu for a class, Japanese students translated it into kanji.

The culinary program at Kapolei, host school of the competition, has its hands in all sort of things. Jeffery Sampson, who with endless good humor is filling the enormous shoes left behind by retired teacher Cynthia Pratt, said two of his students are headed to San Diego in July to a Family Career and Community Leadership of America national competition, where they will present their version of a healthy cup noodle. Sophomore Joshua Danao and junior Kyle Villanueva created a product that offers more than 10 grams of fiber. (Look for a story on the duo in an upcoming issue of Crave.)

At Roosevelt, Gale Suzuki requires her students to develop a business plan for a restaurant, and at Radford, Jamie Kahalewai's students cook a special lunch meal on Fridays. Waipahu's Marauder Cafe has long been lauded, as has Elaine Matsuo, director of the culinary program there, where students have opportunities to participate in culinary events beyond the walls of the school.

Youthful Julie Morihara (she and Mitsuda could be classmates) leads students at Campbell, where they run not one, but two eateries: Saber Grill, a fast-food outfit that sells dollar menu items, and Saber Cafe, a fine-dining restaurant.

Nanakuli's team delivered mahi perfectly marinated in teriyaki sauce. The team went to great lengths to localize their plate, sparing no expense to include a local potatoes for its stuffed mashed potato accompaniment.

Nanakuli's team delivered mahi perfectly marinated in teriyaki sauce. The team went to great lengths to localize their plate, sparing no expense to include local potatoes for its stuffed mashed potato accompaniment. Vegetable confetti was dressed in an ono sesame vinaigrette.

But probably the highlight of my day was visiting with Carol West of Nanakuli High and Intermediate School. Forget about exotic cuisines: Her program opens up students to fresh food, and the idea of home cooking itself. We met last year when I was invited to watch her classes created a true farm-to-table meal using chicken that ag students had raised.

After two huge hugs, she told me she is anxiously awaiting the first-ever graduation of one of her students from Kapiolani Community College's culinary program. Her smile lit up the room when she said she would be in attendance to watch it all happen.

This brings me to my first thought as I pondered the day: Thank you, teachers.
When educators with vision are dedicated enough to create such terrific programs, they raise the bar sky high — and students deliver.

Posted in Education, Food | Comments Off on Thinking big

Chicken returns in fabulous fashion to the Chef Mavro menu

By
April 20th, 2016



Photo courtesy Donna Jung Now on the Chef Mavro Spring menu is the most delicious chicken you'll ever eat. It's fresh and local to start, then brined and roasted with decadent Perigord truffles under its skin.

Photo courtesy Donna Jung
Now on the Chef Mavro Spring menu is the most delicious chicken you'll ever eat. It's fresh and local to start, then brined and roasted with truffles under its skin. The chicken is plated on bearnaise jus alongside asparagus, fork-crushed Yukon potato and a fancy potato crisp.

There's little that makes me appreciate my job more than a visit to Chef Mavro, where chef-owner George Mavrothalassitis discusses food and cooking with earnest exuberance. It's great to talk with someone who has neverending passion for his work.

During a visit last week, the good chef and his chef de cuisine Jonathan Mizukami showed me how they execute a most decadent dish on their Spring menu: brined local chicken roasted with Perigord truffles under the skin. Those truffles, the finest to be had, run $700-$2,000 a pound!

As to local chicken, we haven't seen that in eons, but a North Shore farm is now raising them on a small scale, which freed Mavrothalassitis to put chicken back on his menu — it had long been absent  since the chef's high standard does not allow for frozen product.

The chefs present the heavenly truffle-chicken dish over bearnaise jus with green asparagus, fork-crushed Yukon potato and topped with a crisp potato disc.

Photo by Dennis Oda / doda@staradvertiser.com Chefs George Mavrothalassitis, left, and Jonathan Mizukami demonstrate how to make chicken flavorful by placing delicious items (such as truffles and herbs) under the skin. They also show how to break down and cook a whole chicken. This is a chicken broken down into its pieces.

Photo by Dennis Oda / doda@staradvertiser.com
Chefs George Mavrothalassitis, left, and Jonathan Mizukami demonstrate how to make chicken flavorful by placing delicious items (such as the penultimate Perigord truffles, shown in its whole form beside Mavrothalassitis) under its skin. It all starts by breaking down the chicken while leaving its skin intact.

But back to the preparation: To properly secure the truffles — or anything else tasty placed under the skin, and there are many options — the chicken must be broken down, as in neck, legs and wings removed, WITHOUT removing the skin. It's quite a technique.

The chefs demonstrated the task for me, and I'll explain it step by step, in the June installment of my column, If I Can, You Can. See you there.

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Serious showdown

By
April 17th, 2016



Youth cooking teams from Kokua Kalihi Valley pounded kalo for the preparation of the delicious dishes at the 808 Jr Chef Showdown Competition on Saturday at Palama Settlement.

Two teams from Kokua Kalihi Valley pounded kalo for the preparation of their delicious dishes at the 808 Jr Chef Showdown Competition.

Youth was no barrier to a lineup of excellent food Saturday at the 808 Jr Chef Show Down Competition at Palama Settlement, where six Kalihi youth teams presented their tastiest, most healthful recipes.

Teams hailing from the After School All-Stars at Dole Middle School, Kalihi YMCA, Palama Settlement and Kokua Kalihi Valley dispelled the notion that healthy food means bland or boring. Every dish delivered on taste, with a diversity of flavorful ingredients employed by creative cooks, from quinoa and taro to strawberries, orange juice and Sriracha sauce.

Dishes were required to follow federal MyPlate guidelines and include chicken thighs. The poultry was selected by organizers for its affordability and accessibility, not to mention the fact that it's a forgiving ingredient to cook.

Ehuola Mauka presented their version of Hawaiian Chinese Chicken Stir-Fry, the winning dish.

Kokua Kalihi Valley's Ehuola Mauka team presented its version of Hawaiian Chinese Chicken Stir-Fry, the winning dish. It included hearty uala patties.

While each team went home with an award acknowledging its strength in the contest, the first-place winner was Ehuola Mauka, a group from Kokua Kalihi Valley. Their Hawaiian Chinese Chicken Stir-fry featured a lineup of traditional Hawaiian foods, such as kalo (taro), uala (sweet potato, served up as a hearty patty), palula (sweet potato leaves), hoio (fiddlehead fern), pele (edible hibiscus), olena (tumeric) and coconut oil. A light seasoning of Hawaiian salt allowed the natural flavors of each ingredient to shine through.

In fact, two Kokua Kalihi Valley teams took out traditional wooden boards and pounding stones to prepare kalo for their dishes. Pounders drew more than a few oohs and ahhs, though all of the teams displayed their own strengths in knife and cooking skills, food-safety practices and organization. Every team was exceptional in teamwork and cooperation, even as each member was on-task with specific duties.

A member of Team Palama intently stuffed chicken thighs with a mix of diced mozzarella, macadamia nuts, sundried tomatoes and fresh basil.

A member of Team Palama intently stuffed chicken thighs with a mix of diced mozzarella, macadamia nuts and fresh basil.

The students’ proficiency was not happenstance. Kapiolani Community College, under the direction of chef-instructor Daniel Leung, provided hours of instruction to adult leaders and students, and KCC students were on hand for each team during the contest to lend support.

The rest of the dishes and teams, and the awards they garnered:

Teriyaki Chicken Summer Rolls with Sriracha Sesame Sauce, by the ABDV Team from Kalihi YMCA, won the Awesome Flavors award

Stuffed Chicken Thighs with Quinoa Pilaf, Carrots and Pecans, and Strawberry Salad with Orange-Honey Dressing, by Team Palama, was credited with using the Most Variety of Fruits and Vegetables

Hawaiian Chicken Tacos with Pineapple Salsa, by Team Dreamville from Kalihi YMCA, took Best Presentation for its attractive plating

Hawaiian Chicken Stew, by Ehuola Makai from Kokua Kalihi Valley, was honored for Best Use of MyPlate Guidelines

Dole Chop Suey, by the After-School All-Stars at Dole Middle School, took the award for Outstanding Teamwork

An After-School All-Star member shows great technique in slicing peppers.

An After-School All-Star member shows great technique in slicing peppers.

At the conclusion of the day, contestants were showered with encouragement. Judges commented on the flavorful food and cooperative spirit, and urged students to continue learning about cooking and to strive for a career in the culinary arts. As Leung praised teams for jobs well done, he offered them an open invitation to visit the culinary school and promised to give them tours of the kitchens personally.

Judges were chef Eddie Mafnas of Fire House Food Truck; Jill Puletasi, principal at Kaiulani Elementary School; Todd Morgan, chief information officer at AlohaCare; Melissa Guzman, dietitian at National Kidney Foundation of Hawaii; and this writer.

Hawaiian Chicken Tacos with Pineapple Salsa from Team Dreamville

Hawaiian Chicken Tacos with Pineapple Salsa from Team Dreamville

 

Stuffed Chicken Thighs with Quinoa Pilaf and a Strawberry Salad with Orange-Honey Dressing, from Team Palama

Team Palama's Stuffed Chicken Thighs with Quinoa Pilaf and a Strawberry Salad with Orange-Honey Dressing

 

Hawaiian Chicken Stew, accompanied by freshly pounded poi, served up by Ehuola Makai

Hawaiian Chicken Stew, accompanied by freshly pounded poi, served up by Ehuola Makai

 

The ABDV Team presented Teriyaki Chicken Summer Rolls with Sriracha Sesame Sauce.

The ABDV Team presented Teriyaki Chicken Summer Rolls with Sriracha Sesame Sauce.

 

Dole Chop Suey, by Dole Middle School's After-School All-Stars

Dole Chop Suey, by Dole Middle School's After-School All-Stars

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Passport to free and local

By
April 15th, 2016



Island Popper popcorn is the featured item for Pearlridge Farmers Market's Buy Local, Get Local program tomorrow, where 100 customers can get a bag free after making purchases from five vendors.

Island Popper popcorn is the featured item for Pearlridge Farmers Market's Buy Local, Get Local program tomorrow, where 100 customers can get a bag free after making purchases from five vendors.

At the Pearlridge Farmers' Market tomorrow — and every third Saturday of the month — 100 customers can make the most of their shopping dollars during the Buy Local, Get Local promotion. Be one of the first 100 shoppers to receive the card, then make purchases from five vendors, get a stamp from each, then turn in the card for a free, local item.

This month, that's a bag of Island Popper Popcorn. It's a $4 value!

On May 21, get a freshly baked pastry from Baker Dude; a Mochi Lab cupcake on June 18; and a bag of seasoned Hawaiian salt from Salty Wahine Salt on July 16.

The Pearlridge market, which runs 8 a.m. to noon in the corner of the Sears parking lot, is part of the FarmLovers Farmers' Market lineup owned and operated by Pamela Boyar and Annie Suite. As do all the FarmLovers markets, it features all-local items.

Boyar credits Pearlridge marketing director Kelly Kauinana for creating the popular program.

Boyar and Suite also run markets in Waimea Valley (2 to 6 p.m. Thursdays), Ward Warehouse (8 a.m. to noon Saturdays) and Kailua Elementary School (8:30 a.m. to noon Sundays).

Visit farmloversmarkets.com.

Posted in Farming, Food, Shopping | Comments Off on Passport to free and local

The makings for a beautiful relationship

By
April 13th, 2016



Jin Hirata fries mock chicken made of tofu, marinated in soy sauce, sake and ginger. It was delicious.

At CookSpace on Sunday, visiting New York health coach Jin Hirata fried mock chicken made of tofu, marinated in soy sauce, sake and ginger. It was delicious.

How do you feel about your food? Does it bring you happiness?
Well of course, you're probably thinking, how else would I feel after a nice big helping of chicken katsu/hamburger steak/Spam and eggs?

This is not quite the kind of happiness Jin Hirata envisions. Hirata, a New York dietary health coach who studied macrobiotic cooking, aspires to helping his clients find a deeper experience in eating their meals, one that goes beyond simply satiation. He teaches the concept of appreciating the food you eat, and eating food that promotes health.

For Hirata, this means eating a balanced diet that's mostly plant-based with a wide variety of whole foods.

Miso soup starts a Whole Life Lunch presented by Jin Hirata.

Miso soup starts a Whole Life Lunch.

The key words here are whole (vs. processed) and variety: Plant foods should include dark leafy greens, round veggies and root veggies. A plate should also include foods with different "energies" — think hot/cold, light/heavy, soft/hard, quick cooking/long cooking.

The final element to the plate is what Hirata calls "a touch of Japanese," the presence of miso, umeboshi and/or seaweed. He considers these healing foods and encourages their presence at every meal.

On Sunday, during a visit to Hawaii, Hirata cooked up such a meal and held a Whole Life Lunch for an intimate group at CookSpace in Ward Warehouse. His menu:

Japanese-style Fried "Chicken" with Soft Barley Wakame Salad made for a satisfying main course at a lunch presented Sunday by Jin HIrata.

Japanese-style Fried "Chicken" with Soft Barley Wakame Salad made for a satisfying main course at a lunch held Sunday at CookSpace.

>> Miso soup with tiny cubes of daikon, carrots and sweet potato

>> Soft Barley Wakame Salad, tender barley that topped MAO greens, radish, celery, seaweed and pumpkin seeds

>> Japanese-style Fried "Chicken," a delicious fried dish of tofu marinated in shoyu, ginger and sake

>> Tofu Cream Fruit Parfait, a decadent compilation of tofu flavored with vanilla, maple syrup and lemon, and layered with kiwi, pineapple and other fruit.

The meal was satisfying, delicious, and appealing to the eye as well.

Stay tuned for an upcoming installment in my "If I Can, You Can" column, in which Jin and I will explain how to make that delicious fried "chicken," which indeed smelled and tasted like authentic soy-marinated chicken.

Tofu Cream Fruit Parfait, a luscious, satisfying dessert

Tofu Cream Fruit Parfait, a luscious, satisfying dessert

menu

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