Archive for the ‘Shopping’ Category

Gudetama goodies at Eggs 'n Things, Sanrio

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September 30th, 2016



Gudetama, a popular new Sanrio character, appears at Eggs 'n Things on sunny side up eggs, pancakes, and beverages hot and cold. Photos by Erika Engle.

Gudetama, a popular new Sanrio character, appears at Eggs 'n Things on sunny side up eggs, pancakes, and beverages hot and cold. Photos by Erika Engle.

The public will have chances to eat Gudetama-inspired food and to meet Gudetama Saturday and Sunday at Ala Moana Center’s Sanrio store.

The Sanrio Gudetama character was wheeled in to Eggs 'n Things for a media preview this week.

The Sanrio Gudetama character was wheeled in to Eggs 'n Things for a media preview this week.

Gudetama is the latest sensation from the Hello Kitty maker, and is the inspiration for a fundraising partnership between Eggs ’n Things and the Japan-based lifestyle brand.
Gudetama means “lazy egg” in Japanese, and Sanrio's ovoid character is decidedly unmotivated, asking for "just five more minutes' sleep" under a blanket of bacon, and shrugs off the world with a "meh."
Understand it or not, it is increasingly beloved by many, especially millennials, said Sanrio USA’s Susan Tran, senior manager of marketing.

A different Gudetama sticker will be offered at each location of Eggs 'n Things during the month-long fundraiser.

A different Gudetama sticker will be offered at each location of Eggs 'n Things during the month-long fundraiser.

Gudetama will make 20-minute, top-of-the-hour appearances at the Ala Moana Sanrio shop from 11 a.m. to 4:20 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.
The shop will give customers a small gift with each Gudetama merchandise purchase of $25 or more, limited to one per customer.
The fundraiser is at Eggs ’n Things’ three Hawaii locations at Ala Moana Center and in Waikiki, which are offering two set Gudetama menus through Oct. 28. Each location offers a different Gudetama sticker.
The Gudetama "Sleepy" menu includes a hot chocolate with a cocoa powder Gudetama on top; a  loco moco with a Gudetama-branded egg under a bacon blanket, and for dessert, a pancake with an image of Gudetama stenciled on it in lemon frosting. It is also served with whipped cream, fresh strawberries and chocolate sauce. The dish is served from noon to closing.

Eggs 'n Things and Sanrio are offering two different Gudetama-inspired set menus to raise funds for earthquake victims in Japan.

Eggs 'n Things and Sanrio are offering two different Gudetama-inspired set menus to raise funds for earthquake victims in Japan.

The Gudetama "Lazy" menu is served from 4 p.m. to closing and includes iced coffee or iced cappuccino with a cocoa powder Gudetama on top; a burger topped with a Gudetama-branded egg and French fries, and the same pancake dessert that comes with the "Sleepy" menu choice.

Eggs 'n Things and Sanrio are offering two different Gudetama-inspired set menus to raise funds for earthquake victims in Japan.

Eggs 'n Things and Sanrio are offering two different Gudetama-inspired set menus to raise funds for earthquake victims in Japan.

The Gudetama face on the sunny-side-up egg yolk is essentially an edible sticker, Tran said.
The Gudetama set menus cost $15 and $16, respectively.
Three dollars from each purchase will be donated to the Japan Society's Kumamoto Relief Fund, to aid victims of April’s 7.0 magnitude earthquake in the Japanese prefecture, said Michael Skedeleski, Eggs 'n Things director of operations.

https://www.eggsnthings.com/

 

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Kalo crunch 'pie' hits market

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September 14th, 2016



Adam Tabura's kalo crunch "square pie" will be sold in individual portions and 8-by-8-inch whole cakes.

Adam Tabura's Kalo Krunch "square pie" will be sold in individual portions and 8-by-8-inch whole cakes. Photo by Betty Shimabukuro.

When Adam Tabura was in his first year of culinary school, the students were given an assignment: "You had to make something you grew up with that you didn't know how to make."

Tabura, who grew up on Lanai largely under the watchful eye of his grandfather, decided on a sweet potato crunch cake that his grandparents made.

Years later that exercise has developed into a cake made with poi and sweet potato, with a crust of macadamia nuts and pecans, topped with coconut cream and more crunchy nuts. In a partnership with Hawaiian Pie Co. — they're calling it a "square pie" — Tabura now has his creation, the Kalo Krunch, on the market.

Chef Adam Tabura discusses food styling, dishes and backgrounds for his Filipino cookbook with photographer Kaz Tanabe and Mutual Publishing production director Jane Gillespie at The Pearl restaurant at Leeward Community College. on Tuesday March 15, 2016 in Honolulu, Hawaii. Photo by Kat Wade special to the Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Tabura has several projects in the works this year; the crunch cake is the first to be announced. Photo by Kat Wade.

Tabura, owner of the Spice Rack and a 20-year veteran of several island resort restaurants, shot to fame when he and his brother Lanai and friend Shaun Felipe won the Food Network's "The Great Food Truck Race" in 2013. He says the crunch cake always sells out when he offers it on the truck, but "I only made it when I was in the mood."

It's a lot like a classic pumpkin crunch dessert but because of the taro blend is not nearly as sweet; the delicate cream plays well with the substantial heft of the cake.

It sells for $8.50 per 4-inch square (which can be cut into at least four portions) or $32 for a whole 8-inch "pie." A half-sheet is available for $80 by preorder.

Hawaiian Pie is at 508 Waiakamilo Road; call 988-7828. Closed Sundays and Mondays.

Tabura's new Filipino cookbook launches next week. See Crave on Sept. 21.

 

 

Dean & DeLuca previews first Hawaii location

By
September 9th, 2016



Dean & DeLuca’s first Hawaii location is a bright, airy, two-story market, cafe and wine bar at the base of the Ritz-Carlton Residences Waikiki Beach, at 383 Kalaimoku Street, that will open to the public on Wednesday.

Assistant General Manager Karina Pinto and Executive Chef Johan Svensson of Dean & DeLuca display platters for Star-Advertiser photographer Dennis Oda. Photo by Erika Engle.

Assistant General Manager Karina Pinto and Executive Chef Johan Svensson of Dean & DeLuca display platters for Star-Advertiser photographer Dennis Oda. Blog photos by Erika Engle.

The first floor features a coffee bar and cafe that will offer coffees and other hot or cold drinks with pastries and additional baked goods, as well as ready-to-eat, or heat-and-eat foods that can be purchased for grab-and-go or by-the-pound.
Hawaiian sodas, Dean & DeLuca’s take on Italian sodas, will be offered in tropical flavors including lilikoi, according to General Manager Luke Blubaugh.
The first floor also has a gourmet market with Dean & DeLuca-branded food items and snacks such as coated almonds in a range of flavors, and a variety of chocolate bars, such as salted dark chocolate, and logo items such as tote bags, canvas and insulated, water bottles, and more.

Dean & DeLuca General Manager Luke Blubaugh shows an example of branded merchandise the market will have for sale. Photo by Erika Engle.

Dean & DeLuca General Manager Luke Blubaugh shows an example of branded merchandise the market will have for sale.

Dean & DeLuca chocolate bars on shelving awaiting further stocking.

Dean & DeLuca chocolate bars on shelving awaiting further stocking.

Matcha-flavored coated almonds are among the treats offered at Dean & DeLuca.

Matcha-flavored coated almonds are among the treats offered at Dean & DeLuca.

The second floor wine lounge will offer wines by the glass and noshables such as charcuterie, cheese, or bruschetta platters made using a range of imported, domestic, and made-in-Hawaii products.

An example of a charcuterie platter that will be offered in the second floor wine lounge.

An example of a charcuterie platter that will be offered in the second floor wine lounge.

An example of a cheese platter that will be offered in the second floor wine lounge.

An example of a cheese platter that will be offered in the second floor wine lounge.

An example of a bruschetta trio that will be offered in the second floor wine lounge.

An example of a bruschetta trio that will be offered in the second floor wine lounge. Choices can be mixed and matched.

Specialty meats and cheeses also may be purchased by the pound, and there are 30 to 35 cheeses from which to choose, said Johan Svensson, executive chef for Dean & DeLuca. More are coming from local purveyors, he said. Svensson also is executive chef for BLT Market on the building’s eighth floor.
Dean & DeLuca’s first-floor patio offers outdoor seating for 40, while the second floor lounge can seat as many as 20 people.
Dean & DeLuca will be open from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily starting Wednesday. The first hour of parking is complimentary with a minimum purchase of $30, and costs $4 for each half-hour thereafter.

Corrected: Based on information from the company, a previous version of this story reported a different opening date.

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New Waikiki hot spot lures thousands

By
August 31st, 2016



The redeveloped International Market Place opened in Waikiki this week with thousands of kamaaina and visitors checking out the long-awaited event. All photos by Erika Engle.

A conch shell blower, a Hawaiian chant and speeches by elected- and company officials launched the new IMP.

A conch shell blower, a Hawaiian chant and speeches by elected- and company officials launched the new IMP.

Naturally there were speeches by elected officials and executives with the center's developer, Michigan-based Taubman Centers Inc.

What the crowd was eagerly anticipating, was the doors of about half of the 90 shops and three completed restaurants to open.

Kona Coffee Purveyors, with San Francisco-based b.patisserie inside, had vigorous business on opening day. Photo by Erika Engle.

Kona Coffee Purveyors, with San Francisco-based b.patisserie inside, had vigorous business on opening day.

Belinda Leong, James Beard Award-nominated pastry chef and co-owner of b.patisserie, prepares her famed Kouign-amann pastries for baking. Photo by Erika Engle.

Belinda Leong, James Beard Award-nominated pastry chef and co-owner of b.patisserie, prepares her famed Kouign-amann pastries for baking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Honolulu Cookie Co. had a long line of people awaiting the opening of the doors to its shop, which offers free taste-before-you-buy samples of its various baked-in-Hawaii cookie flavors.

New-to-Hawaii candy store Sugarfina, also brightly and cheerfully lit, was packed with people perusing the shop's sweets, many of which are whimsical and geared toward grown-up tastes.

These candy-coated almonds made to look like martini olives. Photo by Erika Engle.

These chocolate-coated almonds are made to look like martini olives.

The shop offers a large assortment of gummies in various flavors. hoto by Erika Engle.

The shop offers a large assortment of gummies in various flavors.

The Cuba libre gummies, taking their inspiration from a rum and cola beverage, are another grown-up-themed candy selection.

The Cuba libre gummies, taking their inspiration from a rum and cola beverage, are another grown-up-themed candy selection.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Also on the ground floor, a billboard relays a promise of things yet-to-come. The Street, curated by Michelin-starred chef and restaurateur Michael Mina and his team, is set to open in the Spring. Among its more than one dozen dining options will be the Ramen Bar, by chef Ken Tominaga. Tominaga and Mina are partners in Pabu, a popular San Francisco izakaya. The Ramen Bar, which serves Tokyo-style ramen right next door to Pabu, in the city's financial district.

The Street, a food hall concept with more than one dozen casual dining options, is to open in the Spring.

The Street, a food hall concept with more than one dozen casual dining options, is to open in the Spring.

On the third floor Grand Lanai, Eating House 1849 by Roy Yamaguchi, and Stripsteak, by Mina, were ready to open on the first day of IMP's new life. By 11:15 a.m., the Eating House bar was full, and many of the tables also were full of eager diners.

One view of the large bar at Eating House 1849 by Roy Yamaguchi, in Waikiki.

One view of the large bar at Eating House 1849 by Roy Yamaguchi, in Waikiki.

The Eating House kitchen was bustling with Executive Chef Mike Leslie calling out orders and cooks churning out orders.

Executive Chef Mike Leslie works on an order with a red-bandanna-wearing crew member.

Executive Chef Mike Leslie works on an order with a red-bandanna-wearing crew member.

A line formed outside Stripsteak as local people sought to try the famed cuisine by an award-winning chef.

On the market place's opening day, local people and visitors got to try award-winning chef Michael Mina's menu, as prepared by Mina and Executive Chef Ben Jenkins.

On the market place's opening day, local people and visitors got to try award-winning chef Michael Mina's menu, as prepared by Mina and Executive Chef Ben Jenkins.

Smartly dressed Stripsteak General Manager Ron Bonifacio was ready for a busy day with sensible, yet whimsical footwear, for which he is known.

Stripsteak General Manager Ron Bonifacio is known for his shoe collection, which includes these hula-girl festooned sneakers.

Stripsteak General Manager Ron Bonifacio is known for his shoe collection, which includes these hula-girl festooned sneakers.

The expansive International Market Place spans nearly six acres, with stores and restaurants on three levels. Touch-screen directories offer helpful navigational guidance, if you'd like to formulate a plan before heading in to Waikiki.

 IMP's large directories are interactive, with touch-screen technology that also allows for scrolling to the desired information.

IMP's large directories are interactive, with touch-screen technology that also allows for scrolling to the desired information.

More restaurants will open on the Grand Lanai in the coming weeks, and additional retailers also will be opening as time progresses. The International Market Place offers 700 parking stalls, and validated parking, though depending on how long you're there, you may still have to use your plastic in order to exit.

 

 

 

 

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SALT eateries prep for prime time

By
July 29th, 2016



Todd Constantino, executive chef, and Mason Hundhausen, general manager of Moku Kitchen, serve Pumpkin Patch ravioli at a preview event. Photo by Erika Engle.

Todd Constantino, executive chef, and Mason Hundhausen, general manager of Moku Kitchen, serve Pumpkin Patch ravioli at a preview event. Photo by Erika Engle.

At some 8,000 square feet, Moku Kitchen by Peter Merriman will be the largest tenant in Kakaako's SALT development when the restaurant opens in October. Executive Chef Todd Constantino and General Manager Mason Hundhausen, as well as a number of other employees, will be making the trek from Monkeypod Kitchen in Ko Olina to open the new restaurant, to ensure a smooth opening, according to Sara Hill, vice president of development and general counsel for parent company Handcrafted Restaurants.

Some menu items will be familiar to Monkeypod Kitchen devotees, while Moku Kitchen also will offer its own signature dishes cooked in a rotisserie oven. Constantino said the oven and the dishes that emerge from it will give the restaurant a point of differentiation from other restaurants.

To see a listing of SALT tenants that are preparing to open and when, as well as places that are open and operating, keep reading.

Handcrafted pot pies, including kalua pork, traditional chicken, and vegetarian kabocha-kale, as well as other combinations, will be offered at the Village Bottle Shop & Tasting Room. Photo by Erika Engle.

Handcrafted pot pies, including kalua pork, traditional chicken, and vegetarian kabocha-kale, as well as other combinations, will be offered at the Village Bottle Shop & Tasting Room.
Photo by Erika Engle.

Village Bottle & Tasting Shop, set to open in early August, is a project by Star-Advertiser beer industry writer Tim Golden and his business partner Daryn Ogino. The "beer cafe," as Golden calls it, will offer a rotating selection of beers and wines on tap, as well as savory pies and other baked goods by HI Pie owner and baker Casey Burns (shown below). Village is "Hawaii's first bottle shop and tasting room," Golden says, as it also is a retail shop that will specialize in beers. The business isn't aiming to offer the largest beer selection, "just, the best," Golden said. A certified cicerone, like a sommelier is for wines, Golden and Ogino plan to curate the shop's selection and offer "beer geeks" and beer noobs, or those new to brews, "a really good experience," he said.

Customers who chose to buy a bottle can enjoy it on-premises for a corkage fee, from $2 to $4, depending on the bottle size, "and we'll give you glasses," for sharing with friends, perhaps at the 19-foot communal table, while smartphone and laptop users can avail themselves of the free WiFi.

"We want people to feel comfortable here, even if it's just for 20 minutes," Golden said.

Given his longstanding relationships with local brewers, the shop will feature local beers, both on tap and bottled for sale. "Hawaii's (beer) scene is strong and vibrant, and we want to help that thrive," said Golden.

HI Pie owner Casey Burns with a box full of the buttery-crusted savory pies she baked fresh this morning for service at Village Bottle Shop & Tasting Room in Kakaako. Photo by Erika Engle.

HI Pie owner Casey Burns with a box full of the buttery-crusted savory pies she baked fresh this morning for service at Village Bottle Shop & Tasting Room in Kakaako. Photo by Erika Engle.

Burns' baked goods also can be found at the four Island Vintage Coffee shops on Oahu, and soon, at Mr. Tea Cafe. One of its two locations is across from Village Bottle Shop & Tasting Room.

Mr. Tea Cafe has become a popular stop among Pokemon GO players, as he offers a discount for active players. Owner George Huang's shops in Kakaako, and at 909 Kapiolani Blvd., specialize in boba teas, smoothies, and other refreshing treats. The SALT location has been open two months, while the Kapiolani Boulevard shop has been open about two years, he said.

A freshly made latte from 9Bar HNL Coffee, Breakfast and Bake Shop. Artful latte by barista Ryan Plaza. Photo by Erika Engle.

A freshly made latte from 9Bar HNL Coffee, Breakfast and Bake Shop. Artful latte by barista Ryan Plaza. Photo by Erika Engle.

Set to open in early August, 9Bar HNL Coffee, Breakfast & Bake Shop is a modern, gleaming mom-and-pop run by former coffee wholesalers Stephen and Tracey Seta. You will not find a countertop espresso machine. Instead, the equipment is built into the counter providing a more open feeling between customers, the barista, and the kitchen in back. Traditional coffee, fancier coffees such as espressos, lattes and the like, as well as still, cold-brews and nitro brews also will be available. The shop's beverage-making technology also will enable customers to order sparkling juices and teas, said Tracey Seta. As for the business name, 9Bar refers to "the pressure required to extract the perfect espresso shot," Stephen Seta said.

Gabrielle Sanehira, an employee at photography shop Treehouse, holds a vintage camera as an example of the store's merchandise. Photo by Erika Engle.

Gabrielle Sanehira, an employee at photography shop Treehouse, holds a vintage camera as an example of the store's merchandise. Photo by Erika Engle.

Photography buffs may already be familiar with Treehouse's Ward Avenue location, above Kramer's Big & Tall shop. It will be moving to the second floor of SALT, set to open by the end of the year. It will be located near the elevators, said employee Gabrielle Sanehira. The photography shop sells vintage cameras, film, and other accoutrements for photogs and hobbyists who like to keep it old-school.

Open, or preparing to open at SALT:

• ARVO - cafe and lunch spot, inside Paiko - open and operating.

• Bevy - a bar and restaurant, often with live entertainment - open and operating.

• Hank's Haute Dogs - gourmet hot dogs, burgers, Italian beef sandwiches and more - open and operating.

• Highway Inn - Hawaiian food and other local favorites - open and operating.

• Juic'd Life - cold-pressed juices - open and operating.

• Lanikai Juice - juices, smoothies, bowls, more - open and operating.

• Lonohana Chocolate - a Manoa-based maker of estate-grown chocolates - opening date pending.

• Moku Kitchen - a new restaurant concept by chef and restaurateur Peter Merriman - opening in October.

• Morning Brew - a Kailua favorite coffee shop and restaurant - opening in the fall.

• Mr. Tea Cafe - specializing in boba teas, smoothies and other refreshments - open and operating.

• 9Bar HNL Coffee, Breakfast and Bake Shop - specialty coffees, teas, all-day breakfast and baked goods - opening early August.

• Orange Theory Fitness - a gym and health studio - opening in the fall.

• Paiko - botanical boutique - open and operating.

•  Sprint - mobile communications, other services - open and operating.

• Starbucks - specialty coffees, meals, baked goods and other snacks - open and operating.

• The Boiling Crab - seafood restaurant, think brown paper on the tables. Its first location in Hawaii - to open first quarter of 2017.

• Treehouse - cameras, vintage cameras, film, and other photography needs - opening by the end of the year.

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Nostalgia in every bite

By
June 22nd, 2016



Glutino Gluten Free Toaster Pastry satisfies a longtime yearning for that childhood food.

Glutino Gluten Free Toaster Pastry satisfies a longtime yearning for the Pop Tarts of childhood.

In my day, there wasn’t a kid who didn’t love Pop Tarts, those toaster pastries that provided a hot, quickie breakfast in a mere minute. (Straight from the toaster, they were so hot, in fact, that they had to be wrapped in a napkin to be able to hold in the hand, and each bite needed a few seconds to cool between the teeth before chewing, lest you burn your tongue.)

Pop Tarts came in every flavor imaginable, and I was envious of the kids who ate the chocolate and cinnamon varieties in the morning. My mom’s rule was we had to eat a fruit flavor for breakfast; the others were only for snacks. Looking back today, it probably didn’t make a heck of a lot of difference which one we consumed. What with all the frostings and deliciously sweet fillings, there probably wasn’t a tremendous difference in nutritional value — or lack thereof.

The vending machine in our newsroom often carries Pop Tarts, and those of us of a certain age sometimes stop to check what flavors are available. We can’t understand why younger staffers don’t find the pastries appealing.

At my house, I’ve occasionally offered my daughter a Pop Tart from the boxes her father buys. Her response has always been: “Yuck.”

Why have I kept trying with her? Because I’ve wanted to live vicariously. My gluten sensitivity has not allowed me to indulge an absolute yearning for a Pop Tart.

But here’s why hope should always spring eternal: I FOUND A GLUTEN-FREE POP TART!

It happened nearly a year ago, when I spocked boxes of Glutino Gluten Free Toaster Pastry on a shelf at Whole Foods Market. I must admit my excitement was tempered by a bit of caution — some gluten-free products are just plain disastrous.

But this one was fabulous. Not because it was an exact replica of what I recall from childhood; rather, the fillings, made with real fruit, aren’t overbearingly sweet for an adult palate. Coupled with a good gluten-free pastry, they are tasty and delicious. Flavors include strawberry, frosted blueberry, frosted strawberry, and my favorite, apple cinnamon.

And the icing on the proverbial cake? My daughter likes them, too. It makes indulging in a nostalgic food a little bit more of a heartwarming experience.

Whole Foods Market sells a box of five for $5.99, but I’ve got ‘em on regular order at Amazon.com, for roughly the same price.

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Artist captures spirit of Kona Coffee fest

By
June 8th, 2016



Kona artist Carol Tredway's image of a coffee picker at work will be the official image of the Kona Coffee Festival.

Kona artist Carol Tredway's image of a coffee picker at work will be the official image of the Kona Coffee Festival.

Each year the Kona Coffee Festival selects a work of art to represent the theme of the event. The 2016 theme, “Brewed with Tradition,” has been illustrated by Kona artist Carol Tredway with a representation of a coffee picker and Kona farm life. The piece will be featured on commemorative items and in the festival’s 2016 advertising campaign. Look for it in posters, buttons and other retail items.

The festival, in its 46th year, runs Nov. 5 to 13. The key event is a cupping competition that selects the region's top beans for the year. Other highlights:

Nov. 5: Holualoa Village Coffee & Art Stroll and Miss Kona Coffee Scholarship Pageant

Nov. 6: KTA Super Stores Kona Coffee Recipe Contest

Nov. 8: Council farm and mill tour

Nov. 10: Cupping competition 

Nov. 11: Lantern parade
Nov. 12: Ho‘olaule‘a

Nov. 13: Aloha Makahiki Concert with kumu hula Mika Keale-Goto and Halau Keale

For a complete list of events visit konacoffeefest.com

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Food and wine fest features fish

By
May 25th, 2016



This opah, or moonfish, was presented at the United Fishing Agency auction. It is also known as Moonfish.

This opah, or moonfish, was presented at the United Fishing Agency auction.

Tuesday started early for Hawaii Food and Wine Festival participants who wanted to see Honolulu’s famed fish auction and visit Tamashiro Market to sample poke.
Chefs George Mavrothalassitis and Lee Anne Wong accompanied the tour and talked story with paid guests, answering questions along the way. They were to conduct a poke demonstration at the  Kahala Hotel & Resort, host hotel for the HF&WF Culinary Journey launch event.
John Kaneko of the nonprofit Hawaii Seafood Council led the United Fishing Agency fish auction tour, which started pier-side with an explanation of how commercial long-line fishing boat crews lay their lines while out on the ocean, with hooks at depths ranging from 50 meters to 350 meters.
With some 3,000 baited hooks, the percentage of fish caught each time the line is laid, is 1.1, he said. “Ninety-nine of 100 hooks are empty,” he said, so the boats are out for 11 to 14 days, and immediately process the fish and stow them below deck on ice.
Once inside United Fishing Agency, the auction was in full swing, with pallets of fish being wheeled in as Kaneko explained the differences between the grades of fish, the basics of what to look for when choosing fish at the market, and more.

John Kaneko, of the nonprofit Hawaii Seafood Council, explains the fresh fish grading process.

John Kaneko, of the nonprofit Hawaii Seafood Council, explains the fresh fish grading process.

The fish are laid side-by-side with a portion of the tail cut out, yielding a flat, or fileted cut and a “steak” cut, as well as a cored sample. The auctioneer barks out information about each fish, and fish buyers stake their claims before moving on to the next fish.
For those of us who are not experts, the differences between the big eye ahi flesh from fish to fish was stunning. Color and texture ranged from lusciously glistening and red, to lighter red with pinky, fatty tissue prized by many, to brown and dull, some with space between the muscle tissue. Kaneko described the latter as “gaping,” and said the brown flesh definitely would not be destined for use as sashimi.
Anything at the supermarket that is cherry red and “screaming at you” has likely been gassed with carbon monoxide to enhance the fish’s color, Kaneko said. The council offers fish auction tours via its website.

It was then on to Tamashiro Market, where owner Guy Tamashiro, a regular at the fish auction, is getting a new parking lot at his North King Street shop.
Tamashiro’s is known not just as one of the go-to stops for New Year’s ahi, but for selling reef fish and other seafoods popular with local residents, as well as produce including green papaya, marungay leaves, raw peanuts, and other items not readily found at many supermarkets.
Of the reef fish, Uhu is very popular, Tamashiro said.
They live in “harems,” Tamashiro explained, adding that if the male should die, a dominant female will transform into a male to keep the group going. Males are blue, and females are red, and while undergoing the gender change, the red female will begin to turn blue.
“I only learned that today,” said Mavro, though he loves cooking uhu, and says the female of the species has a superior flavor.

Tamashiro Market owner Guy Tamashiro pulled two uhu from the display, to show the gender-changing process the formerly female one in front had been undergoing. The blue fish immediately behind it, is male.

Tamashiro Market owner Guy Tamashiro pulled two uhu from the display, to show the gender-changing process the formerly female one in front had been undergoing. The blue fish immediately behind it, is male.

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Super cool tool

By
May 18th, 2016



spurtle

Ever stumble upon a tool that ends up being something you can’t live without? This happened to me years ago, when I still lived at home and my mother was gifted with a wooden spatula, slightly curved and pointed on one end, that made nearly every stovetop task easier to execute. When I moved out I pondered stealing it.

So it was with this educated eye that I assessed the Spurtle, from Mad Hungry. Part spoon, part spatula, the Spurtle is a seemingly unassuming paddle with a long, wide flat surface that allows for efficiency and versatility. It makes quick work of tossing a panful of stir-fry or fried rice, folding delicate whipped cream into a dessert, scraping the flesh from a squash, scraping the edges and corners of a pan, and scooping and spreading a nut butter over a slice of bread in one fell swoop. And because the Spurtle is flat, it's simple to scrape off any food or sauce stuck on its surface, by simply scraping it against the edge of the pan or bowl you're working with.

It’s a tool to reach for everyday. And because it's wooden, it won't scratch pots and pans. The Spurtle is based on a 500-year-old tool from Scotland, originally used for stirring vats of oatmeal.

Mad Hungry is a cooking website run by cookbook author and television cooking show host Lucinda Scala Quinn and her sons. Quinn is also a senior vice president at Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia. All this media experience has made Quinn quite savvy, and she peddles her Spurtles on the television shopping channel QVC (channel 2 on Oceanic Time Warner), which is where I got my set.

It comprises four pieces made of acacia: a full-size, 12-3/4-by-2-inch Spurtle; a full-size slotted version, a mini, 8-3/4-by-2-inch solid Spurtle, and a long, made-to-fit spoon rest. Though the set was priced at $19.98, after an exorbitant $9.22 shipping to Hawaii, plus $1.31 tax, the grand total was $30.51. Still, at about $7.63 apiece and a one-year warranty, the ease it provides in the kitchen makes it a worthwhile investment.

Here are some other things I saw Quinn do with the Spurtle in a video on QVC's site (qvc.com), which is posted along with the product info: With the regular tool, she scooped mayo into a bowl with some canned tuna or chicken (I couldn't tell which) and was able to stir and break up meat chunks, then fold in other ingredients, in mere seconds. Using the slotted Spurtle, she efficiently incorporated butter into a pot of cooked potato chunks while roughly mashing them; scrambled eggs by using the tool as a whisk; whisked dry ingredients, then whisked it with wet ingredients; and even separated eggs by resting the tool over a bowl and carefully pouring precracked eggs over the slots. The mini spreader made rapid work of frosting cupcakes with one quick twist of the wrist.

At madhungry.com, a two-piece bamboo set sells for $24.99, with a standard $8 shipping to Hawaii. It includes a 13-by-2-inch Spurtle and a 8-3/4-by-2-inch mini version.

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Poke Pau Hana pairs seafood and suds

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April 19th, 2016



This card, printed on two sides, illustrates which craft beers pair best with Foodland poke varieties. It will be available in stores and on the Foodland website.

This card, printed on two sides, illustrates which craft beers pair best with Foodland poke varieties. It will be available in stores and on the Foodland website.

Starting bright and early Wednesday morning, Foodland Super Market will up its already-go-to poke-purveyor status with a craft beer pairing program called Poke Pau Hana.

In a partnership with Southern Wine & Spirits, Foodland and Sack N Save locations will show customers the craft beers that pair best with 10 of its 20 different poke choices.

It will be "a whole new tasting experience … a whole new way of enjoying poke," said Sheryl Toda, Foodland senior director of marketing and corporate communications, at a Tuesday evening "sneak peak" tasting event at which nary a green bottle was in sight.

Starting Wednesday customers will see a variety of the beers displayed at the seafood counters where the poke is sold. Two-sided tasting cards, like the one pictured here, will be available to customers looking to make pairing choices and to make their own notations about what they liked about each pairing — or didn't. Cards and information touting the program also will be available near the beer displays.

This card, printed on two sides, illustrates which craft beers pair best with Foodland poke varieties. It will be available in stores and on the Foodland website.

This card, printed on two sides, illustrates which craft beers pair best with Foodland poke varieties. It will be available in stores and on the Foodland website.

Sampling will be offered at select stores, Toda said, and each week a discounted price will be offered on the featured craft beer. Information about which stores will offer samplings will be shared via Foodland's social media channels.

The pairings were achieved by Foodland and Southern Wine & Spirits culinary staff; cicerones, or certified beer professionals; and executives, during meetings that included some "robust discussions," said Foodland Corporate Chef Keoni Chang. Working their way through as many as 50 craft beers, the choices were made. The hope is that the suggested pairings won't be an end-all for customers, but rather the beginning of "a journey," and further "conversation," Chang said.

He and Southern Wine & Spirits officials on hand encouraged tasters to linger over the flavors in both the poke and the beer, to let their palates discern how the flavors in each poke sample balanced or complemented — or even contrasted with — the notes in each beer's taste profile.

For the tasting event, seafood managers from different Foodland locations prepared poke freshly, on-site, for sampling by guests, along with a small pouring of the selected brew. Each tasting station offered water and so-called dump buckets to rinse out the provided glasses so as to keep the flavor of each new sampled beer, true.

One highly popular choice for the night was the local favorite spicy ahi poke, paired with New Belgium Fat Tire Amber Ale, which some enthusiasts said has recently become available in Hawaii.

This post eventually will be updated with some photos of the pairings, but this writer wanted you to be informed of the new Poke Pau Hana program at Foodland as soon as possible because, as they say, 'it's five o'clock somewhere.'

 

 

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